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What’s new in Kubernetes containers

The latest version of the container orchestration system Kubernetes, 1.11, adds a new load-balancing method and provides custom resource definitions. 

Where to download Kubernetes

You can download the Kubernetes source from the releases page of its official GitHub repository. Kubernetes is also available by way of the upgrade process provided by the various vendors that supply Kubernetes distributions.

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YugaByte review: Planet-scale Cassandra and Redis

During my decades as a database application developer, I never imagined in my wildest dreams that I would ever have access to a transactional, planet-scale, distributed database, much less that I would be comparing many of them. But with Google Cloud Spanner, CockroachDB, Azure Cosmos DB, Neo4j Enterprise, and most recently YugaByte DB all available in production, that one-time pipe dream is now quite real.

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Java 101: Mastering Java exceptions, Part 1

Java exceptions are library types and language features used to represent and deal with program failure. In the first half of this article you’ll learn about basic language features and library types that have been around since Java 1.0. In the second half you’ll discover advanced capabilities introduced in more recent Java versions. If you’ve wanted to understand how failure is represented in source code, you’ve come to the right place. In addition to an overview of Java exceptions, I’ll get you started with Java’s language features for throwing objects, trying code that may fail, catching thrown objects, and cleaning up your Java code after an exception has been thrown.

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Ryan Dahl’s Node.js regrets lead to Deno

What might the Node.js server-side JavaScript runtime look like today if founder Ryan Dahl could build it all over again? With his Deno project, a secure TypeScript runtime built on the same Google V8 JavaScript engine as Node.js, we get an idea.

Open source Deno, which is not explicitly compatible with Node.js, is a minimal take on server-side JavaScript. One key difference between Deno and Node is Deno eliminates the need for a package manager. (Node.js uses the popular NPM package manager.) “There are no packages even,” Dahl said. “You only link to JavaScript files—like you do in the web.” Deno also cannot run Node scripts. It does use TypeScript, which Dahl views as being well-done and approachable. Dahl recently described Deno as being in an “extreme prototype” stage of development and cautioned against all but the most-diehard technical people from trying it.

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Kotlin tutorial: Get started with Kotlin

As I discussed in my article “What is Kotlin? The Java alternative explained,” Kotlin is a general purpose, open source, statically typed “pragmatic” programming language that combines object-oriented and functional programming features. You can use Kotlin to build applications for the Java Virtual Machine (JVM), Android, browsers, and native apps on MacOS, Linux, Windows, iOS, WebAssembly, and Android. Kotlin was created by JetBrains and released to open source under the Apache 2 license.

Why learn Kotlin? The short answer is that Kotlin is a better language for the JVM than Java. Kotlin is less verbose, supports all the features of functional programming, eliminates the danger of null pointer references, streamlines the handling of null values, and maintains 100 percent interoperability with Java and Android. All of that will make you a more productive programmer than you would be writing Java, even if you start by using Kotlin to build new features into an existing Java application.

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Open source’s existential dilemma: the meaning of ‘free'

Open source has never been more popular, but it’s unclear that this has as much to do with its licensing as with its price tag. Years ago, we were quick to distinguish open source as “free as in freedom, not free as in beer.” Two decades on, developers are demanding the beer but are somewhat nonchalant about the freedom. Just ask GitHub.

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The future of Java: How Jakarta EE will unfold under Eclipse

The newly released “strawman” technical vision for the Eclipse Foundation’s enterprise Java platform, now called Jakarta EE, focuses on portable cloud-native application deployment as well as Java 9 modularity. The project would operate on a one-year release schedule.

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The Kubernetes ‘fork’: Open source purists miss the point

It was bound to happen. Kubernetes, so often held up as a paragon of community virtue, turned into a petty “more-open-than-thou” battleground between Heptio CEO (and Kubernetes cofounder) Joe Beda and, well, everyone else.

Beda’s argument, strenuously denied by Red Hat employees and supporters, is that Red Hat OpenShift forks Kubernetes and isn’t 100-percent conformant. Beda’s coup de grace, however, is that “many customers” think it matters “a lot” whether OpenShift is a fork or “layers cleanly” on the upstream Kubernetes project.

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Oracle plans to dump risky Java serialization

Oracle plans to drop from Java its serialization feature that has been a thorn in the side when it comes to security. Also known as Java object serialization, the feature is used for encoding objects into streams of bytes. Used for lightweight persistence and communication via sockets or Java RMI, serialization also supports the reconstruction of an object graph from a stream. 

Removing serialization is a long-term goal and is part of Project Amber, which is focused on productivity-oriented Java language features, says Mark Reinhold, chief architect of the Java platform group at Oracle.

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