AWS Lambda tutorial: Get started with serverless computing

If laziness really is one of the virtues of a great programmer, then AWS Lambda is like a developer’s holy grail. With Lambda, you don’t have to spin up any servers, or configure or patch them, or pay for them to run hour after hour and week after week. You don’t even have to write much code.

AWS Lambda is about getting the job done with least effort—and little cost. You write simple functions and wire them to a request or an event, and Lambda executes those functions whenever that request or event occurs. You get charged only when your code actually runs.

(Insider Story)
Source: New feed

Git essentials: Get started with Git version control

This article introduces you to Git, including how to install the necessary software to access Git servers where your software project will be stored.

Version control concepts

To understand Git and the concept of version control, looking at version control from an historical perspective is helpful. There have been three generations of version control software.

The first generation

The first generation was very simple. Developers worked on the same physical system and “checked out” one file at a time.

To read this article in full, please click here

Source: New feed

Big data analytics with Neo4j and Java, Part 1

Relational databases have dominated data management for decades, but they’ve recently lost ground to NoSQL alternatives. While NoSQL data stores aren’t right for every use case, they are generally better for big data, which is shorthand for systems that process massive volumes of data. Four types of data store are used for big data:

  • Key/value stores such as Memcached and Redis
  • Document-oriented databases such as MongoDB, CouchDB, and DynamoDB
  • Column-oriented data stores such as Cassandra and HBase
  • Graph databases such as Neo4j and OrientDB

This article introduces Neo4j, which is a graph database used for interacting with highly related data. While relational databases are good at managing relationships between data, graph databases are better at managing n-th degree relationships. As an example, take a social network, where you want to analyze patterns involving friends, friends of friends, and so on. A graph database would make it easy to answer a question like, “Given five degrees of separation, what are five movies popular with my social network that I have not yet seen?” Such questions are common for recommendation software, and graph databases are perfect for solving them. Additionally, graph databases are good at representing hierarchical data, such as access controls, product catalogs, movie databases, or even network topologies and organization charts. When you have objects with multiple relationships, you’ll quickly find that graph databases offer an elegant, object-oriented paradigm for managing those objects.

To read this article in full, please click here

Source: New feed

(Insider Story)
Source: New feed

What’s new for developers in Android P

The initial developer beta of Google’s forthcoming Android P operating system looks to entice developers with enhancements for Kotlin coding, machine learning, and application compatibility.

The use of Kotlin as a supported language in Android Studio (via a plugin) lets developers improve the performance of their code, Google says.

Source: New feed

How to choose the right NoSQL database

NoSQL databases provide high operational speed and increased flexibility for software developers and other users when compared to traditional tabular (or SQL) databases.

The data structures used by NoSQL databases—key-value, wide column, graph, or document—differ from those used by relational databases. As a result, NoSQL databases. NoSQL databases can be scaled across thousands of servers, though sometimes with loss of data consistency. But what makes NoSQL databases especially relevant today is that they are particularly well suited for working with large sets of distributed data, which makes them a good choice for big data and analytics projects.

To read this article in full, please click here

Source: New feed

JavaFX will be removed from the Java JDK

JavaFX, Oracle’s 10-year-old rich client development technology for Java, will be decoupled from the Java Development Kit (JDK) and broken out into its own separate module.

Making JavaFX its own module will make it easier to adopt and clear the way for new contributors, Oracle said. The company added that with the faster release schedule being implemented for standard Java and the JDK, JavaFX needs to be on its own pace driven by contributions from Oracle and others in the OpenJFX community.

Source: New feed

What’s new in the Spring Boot 2.0 builder for Java apps

Spring Boot, a tool for building production-grade applications that use the popular Spring Framework for Java development, is now in Version 2.0, four years after its first version shipped.

Version 2.0 adds support for Spring Framework 5.0, which was released in September with support for Java 9, JUnit 5, and the Kotlin language. Spring Boot  favoring predefined conventions over developer configuration for rapid application development. Applications can be started using java-jar or more traditional War (web application archive) deployments.

To read this article in full, please click here

Source: New feed

Go gains a foothold in the workplace

The Google Go language (Golang), the popular open source systems-level programming language, is gaining more of a foothold in the workplace, according to the Go 2017 User Survey. More respondents (67 percent) said they were being paid to write Go than those who said they write Go code outside of work (63 percent).

Also, the number of respondents who strongly agreed with the notion that Go was critical to their company’s success rose to 17 percent, up from year 12 percent in the 2016 survey.

To read this article in full, please click here

Source: New feed

Node.js roadmap: What’s next for the JavaScript runtime

Node.js, the popular server-side JavaScript runtime, is expected to add improvements in a range of areas by 2020, including HTTP/2, modularization and NPM security.

Athough Node.js Version 10 is slated to debut in April, additional capabilities are planned for future versions.

Expected new features for Node.js

Two Node.js technical steering committee members have shared features under consideration, mostly for after Version 10’s release:

To read this article in full, please click here

Source: New feed