Julia tutorial: Get started with the Julia language

As I discussed in “What is Julia?,” Julia is a free open source high-level, high-performance dynamic programming language for numerical computing that combines the development convenience of a dynamic language with the performance of a compiled statically typed language. It was designed to be good for scientific computing, machine learning, data mining, large-scale linear algebra, distributed computing, and parallel computing, and to have the ease of use of Python, R or even Matlab.

There are five major options for working with Julia: JuliaBox online; an installation of the Julia command line; an installation of JuliaPro; Visual Studio Code plus a plug-in and a Julia or JuliaPro installation; and Jupyter notebooks with IJulia. Let’s consider the pros and cons of each.

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When it comes to databases, why ‘I can’t quit you, baby’

If any company had a reason to dump Oracle, it’s Amazon. And yet, 14 years after Amazon lamented its “straining database infrastructure on Oracle” and started to “evaluate if we could develop a purpose-built database that would support our business needs for the long term,” the commerce and cloud provider won’t be free of Oracle until the first quarter of 2020, as reported by CNBC’s Jordan Novet.

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Get started with Rust, the language for safer code

Over the last couple of years, Rust has gone from a curiosity brewed up in the lab of a Mozilla employee to a strong contender for writing the next generation of native apps and bare-metal solutions. But those advances come from Rust providing its own tool chain and component management system—along with its own features and quirks.

This article walks through the basics of setting up a working environment in Rust, configuring an IDE, and making the most of the tool set Rust provides for app development.

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Guido van Rossum resigns: What’s next for Python

Python inventor Guido van Rossum shocked the Python world on July 12 when he stepped down as the language’s so-called BDFL (benevolent dictator for life). At the time, he cited acrimony over a recent Python enhancement proposal for a language expressions capability as motivating his exit.

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Git might replace Mercurial for Java’s source-code management

Developers participating in the evolution of standard Java may soon have a new source-code management system for the project, with the community set to investigate alternatives—including Git—to the current Mercurial repository scheme.

The effort, dubbed Project Skara, is intended to help contributors to OpenJDK, including seasoned committers and relative newcomers, be more productive. Under Skara, alternative source control management and code review management options would be explored, with Git an option.

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GKE tutorial: Get started with Google Kubernetes Engine

Kubernetes will save us all. If only we could work out how to install and maintain it. For the uninitiated, Kubernetes (also known as K8s to your local neighborhood hipster developer) is an open-source platform for running and orchestrating container-based applications and services. These are most often deployed in Docker containers, but other container runtimes—such as Containerd and Rkt—are supported.

Google has accumulated a great deal of knowledge about running containers in their operations over the past decade and a half. Kubernetes represents the third generation of container management systems at Google, after Borg and Omega, and has emerged as the principal container platform these past few years, pushing past other offerings such as Mesos and Docker’s Swarm. For the enterprise, Kubernetes offers something close to the Holy Grail: “What if OpenStack, but it actually works?”

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Go Cloud aims to cement Golang in the cloud

Google wants to make its Go language (Golang) a staple of cloud application development with its open source Go Cloud project, featuring a library and tools to build apps that can be ported across different clouds. Available in a very early beta version, Go Cloud is not yet suitable for production use.

Go offers cloud development benefits, including low latency and built-in concurrency. Go Cloud, meanwhile, provides APIs to write simpler, more-portable applications.

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Mastering Spring framework 5, Part 1: Spring MVC

Spring MVC is the Spring framework’s traditional library for building Java web applications. It is one of the most popular web frameworks for building fully functional Java web applications and RESTful web services. In this tutorial, you’ll get an overview of Spring MVC and learn how to build Java web applications using Spring Boot, Spring Initializr, and Thymeleaf.

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Get the source code for example applications in this tutorial. Created for JavaWorld by Steven Haines

Spring Boot with Spring Initializr

We’ll fastrack our Spring MVC web application with the help of Spring Boot and Spring Initializr. Given input for the type of application to be built, Spring Initializr uses the most common dependencies and defaults to setup and configure a basic Spring Boot application. You can also add custom dependencies and Spring Initializr will include and manage them, ensuring version compatibility with both third-party software and Spring. Spring Boot applications run standalone, without requiring you to provide a runtime environment.

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Software security: There’s more to it than bug-bounty programs

By one estimate, more than 100 billion lines of code are released each year, with an ever-increasing proportion of that software connected to the internet. With more connected code, there’s more risk of hackers connecting to that code for their own nefarious ends.

Given this opportunity for compromised code, bug-bounty programs are booming. Although positive, they’re just one component of how to deliver superior security.

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Oracle: Switch now from Nashorn JavaScript engine to GraalVM

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