Java JDK 10: What new features to expect in the next Java

Developers who may be just getting used to Java 9, released in September 2017, will have only a few months left before the next generation of Java is out. In mid-December, the planned Java Development Kit 10 upgrade moved to a rampdown phase. In the initial rampdown phase, only P1 through P3 bugs can be fixed.

When JDK 10 will be released

JDK 10, an implementation of Java Standard Edition 10, is due for production release on March 20, 2018. Key improvements proposed include a local type inference and a “clean” interface for garbage collection.

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How to excel in agile software development

If you are leading or participating in an agile development process and have selected an agile model like the scrum methodology, you have a fundamental process to help align product owners with customer needs and teams on delivering results. You have the team’s responsibilities outlined, a meeting structure defined and scheduled, and an agile collaboration tool to manage the backlog.

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Jenkins tutorial: Get started with Jenkins continuous delivery

Jenkins is one of the earliest and still one of the most-used continuous integration and continuous delivery (CICD) servers. It has lots of competition these days, but still has a robust community and a wide range of plugins (1,400 when I last checked). Even if you wind up using a different automation server, it is worth understanding how to use Jenkins: The underlying concepts of CICD don’t change much from one implementation to another, even though the vendors do tend to make up their own terminology.

In this article I’ll draw on the official Jenkins tutorials, in particular the one that shows you how to use the new-ish Blue Ocean GUI, but add my own explanations and illustrations for steps and code that may be obscure. My goal is to get you to the point where you can create build, test, and delivery pipelines for your own projects.

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Why old-school PostgreSQL is so hip again

PostgreSQL (aka Postgres) is old as dirt, yet over the past five years it has panned out as pure gold. MongoDB got the billion-dollar IPO and AWS launched the mind-bendingly cool Aurora Serverless, but it’s PostgreSQL that keeps having its moment—again and again and again.

Now the world’s fourth most popular database, according to DB-Engines’ multicomponent ranking, PostgreSQL has a ways to go before it surpasses Oracle, MySQL, and Microsoft SQL Server. Yet at its current pace, there’s every reason to expect it could get there.

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Programming with Java APIs, Part 2: API definitions

The first half of this article introduced the big picture of programming with Java APIs–such as how Java APIs fit into application development, cloud and microservices architectures, and the role of API specs like OpenAPI. You were introduced to OpenAPI and we developed a simple example application built from an API definition.

In this article we’ll continue developing our Java API definitions and application code with OpenAPI and Swagger, and we’ll throw Swing Web MVC and Angular 2 into the mix. By the end of the article, we’ll have used Swagger tools to both generate OpenAPI from a Spring MVC app, and generate an Angular frontend from an OpenAPI specification. You will be familiar with the core Swagger tools, and you’ll know how to use them to build your own API-driven Java web apps.

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API-driven development with OpenAPI and Swagger, Part 2

The first half of this article introduced the big picture of APIs–such as how they fit into application development, cloud and microservices architectures, and the role of API specs like OpenAPI. You were introduced to OpenAPI and we developed a simple example application built from an API definition.

In this article we’ll continue developing our API definitions and application code with OpenAPI and Swagger, and we’ll throw Swing Web MVC and Angular 2 into the mix. By the end of the article, we’ll have used Swagger tools to both generate OpenAPI from a Spring MVC app, and generate an Angular frontend from an OpenAPI specification. You will be familiar with the core Swagger tools, and you’ll know how to use them to build your own API-driven web apps.

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What’s next for the Groovy language: The 2018 roadmap

Groovy, the veteran language for the Java virtual machine, has several enhancements on its roadmap, such as to support Java 9 modularity and Java 8 lambda capabilities. Although closely linked to Java, Groovy offers additional capabilities such as the ability to write compile-time transformations and macros.

The Apache Software Foundation plans the following Groovy upgrades in the next year:

  • Versions 2.5, due in early 2018 for Java 7 and later.
  • Version 2.6 and 3.0, both set to arrive in about a year, and both currently available in alpha releases. Version 2.6 is aimed at Java 7 users, and Version 3.0 at Java 8 and 9 users; their capabitiies will be similar.

Planned Groovy 3.0 features

When Groovy 3.0 is released, you can expect the following additions and enhancements:

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Open source innovation is now all about vendor on-ramps

In the enterprise world, open source has long been a bit tentative. Starting in the early 2000s, various vendors started contributing bits and pieces of code, careful not to give away anything too valuable, all while hoping for positive marketing effect. It was, as Stephen Walli wrote in 2007, a matter of gifting complementary technology to secure potential customers’ interest in the core of your business.

It mostly didn’t work.

Today, open source has become a primary driver of innovation, but we’re still too tentative in our contributions. Much of the most impressive innovation is being hatched at the public cloud vendors, specifically Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud (“AMG,” as Bernard Golden calls them), with TensorFlow, Kubernetes, and more being contributed to the wider open source community.

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What are microservices? Lightweight software development explained

You’re sitting on hundreds of thousands of lines of legacy C++. Oh, who are we trying to kid? It’s millions of lines of Vectran, a short-lived Fortran variant created by IBM in the 1970s. But, hey, if it ain’t broke, right? Except it is broken. Any time someone tries to add a feature, the thing breaks. Even trying to fix bugs creates more bugs. But if you just don’t touch it, it keeps on working.

The problem is that innovation demands agility and velocity. All the cool companies that never had to worry about Y2K are outpacing your clunky old legacy software. Investors are demanding the next big thing. Customers are jumping ship in droves.

The answer is to kill your application monoliths, and not create any more new ones. The way to do that is by using microservices architecture, a technique that breaks large applications into lightweight apps that can be scaled horizontally.

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